Spring Garden Day

Today I attended the WSU Benton County Extension Spring Garden Day.  There was a good turn out and I think everyone there came away with new knowledge and a greater appreciation for gardening.

I gave a presentation on tomatoes, which I think went well, though I regret not having been able to get to everyone’s questions.  I covered maybe half the material I had prepared, but given the time we spent in questions I hope it was the half everyone was looking for.  If you have questions about the presentation, or are just looking for more information on growing tomatoes in our area, please feel free to comment below, or write me at tomatoes@34.215.132.115.  (That would also be the address for tomato plant preorders and questions.)

Thanks to everyone who attended, and the the County Extension for having me as their guest.

Tomato transplanting

tomato seedlings closeupTomatoes germinate for me in 2-10 days, depending on the temperature and freshness of the seed.  It is imperative that they get under lights immediately after they hatch or the stems will quickly become very long.  I use metal halide lamps with a daylight (blue) spectrum, which lets me cover a large area without needing the plants right up against the lamp, and additionally provides heat.  I’ve had better results moving the seedlings outside from metal halide illumination than from flourescent as well.

I usually wait to transplant until I can see the beginning of the second set of leaves.  This generally happens at four weeks from the time of sowing, but really it varies with the variety of tomato and type of leaves as well.  I can get away with this anywhere from 2-6 weeks, after which the seedlings start to deteriorate.

Tomato TransplantsI flood the trays with water about one hour before transplanting which loosens the soil and makes the seedlings easy to pull out.  They are planted in 1801 deep flats and buried as deep as possible without covering the leaves.  I use Promix BX for this, which has given me the best results of anything I’ve tried.  I can hand transplant about one tray every 5 minutes, which still adds up to 12 hours of work for the 72 flats I did this year.

Currently I don’t fertilize, spray or use any chemicals at all on the tomato starts while they’re in the greenhouse.  The inserts and soil are new and reasonably sterile and I’ve never had issues with tomato fungal infections in the six years I’ve been growing large numbers of seedlings at my present location.  I’ve thought about using an organic fertilizer, but really I don’t know what I would want to gain from it.  My plants are strong, vigorous and sturdy at the time they’re ready for sale.